ROA’S FACTORY

ROA’S FACTORY

These factory ruins are all that remain of the large-scale cotton spinning mill and weaving mill that was established there in the second half of the 19th century. The textile factory remained active until its bankruptcy in the 1960s. Afterwards a copper foundry settled on the grounds and in the buildings. The copper foundry evolved into a metal processing company, which became mainly active in supplying parts for the automotive industry. Due to the increasing demand, the company was soon bursting at the seams. In 1997 they moved to a new and larger site and these buildings have been empty ever since. Inside the factory we come across some fine examples of graffiti art by artist ROA, who we also encountered earlier in Skeleton Factory. The city, which now owns the land and buildings, plans a new housing project here, which will attempt to integrate ROA’s artworks into the concept…


WITWE HANNAH

WITWE HANNAH

It is usually difficult to find background information about abandoned private houses. Who lived there? Why did they leave everything behind? In some instances the property is left behind after a fire. That seems to have been the case here too. The roof and the second story are pretty much entirely gone. I was somewhat reluctant to go in here at first. It didn’t look like there would be anything interesting inside. I’m glad I decided to go have a look anyway. We had a good time in there and the visit yielded a few nice shots after all… Whaddaya think?


CHURCH OF THE RAVEN

CHURCH OF THE RAVEN

This neo Romanesque church was designed by a Ghent architect and has a basilica plan (high middle nave with lower side aisles). The nave has a remarkable flat, wooden panelled ceiling. Also typical of the (neo) Romanesque style is the choir that opens into an apse with a cul-de-four (vault in the shape of a half dome). The walls of the nave rest on arcades alternately resting on strong pillars and columns with capitals. The tower is planted laterally against the western facade. The green sandstone of Dolhain emphasizes the sobriety and Roman character of this sanctuary, built between 1906 and 1907.

On a Sunday morning in August 2015, the fire brigade had to rush out because the entire bell tower was on fire. The fire turned out to have been caused by copper thieves, who were stealing the copper in the wiring of the tower. The church had been empty for a few years at that time. Due to the inaccessibility of the tower, it took several hours for the fire brigade to master the flames. The damage was considerable. Since the church does not have a protected character, it seems almost inevitable that it will be completely demolished in the near future…


MOLD HOUSE

MOLD HOUSE

One of the many, many houses in Belgium that has been left behind when the last inhabitants moved into a retirement home or died without heirs. In many cases these houses quickly fall victim to theft, vandalism and sometimes even arson. This particular house has been spared from all that, but not from natural decay. Due to years of water seepage, fungi have been given free rein and by now they are pretty much everywhere. An entirely unhealthy situation, but it makes a nice setting for photography… 


ZECHE M

ZECHE M

The charter for the exploitation of this coal mine in the German Ruhr area was awarded in the beginning of the 1860s, but it would take another 40 years before test drilling would be carried out for the first time in this eastern part of the almost 40 square mile mining area. From 1912 the actual reclamation of Zeche M began, where anthracite was mined. It was mined at depths ranging between 1150 and 2800 feet. During the peak years, 2.5 million tons of anthracite were annually won by more than 8,000 employees. Exactly 100 years after the start of the mining the mine was shut down. A large part of the buildings has now been demolished. It is not entirely clear whether everything will be demolished in the long run, or that this building with the monumental entrance hall and the halls with the typical hanging baskets will be preserved… During our visit the building was still heated.


“W” Hydraulic Power Plant – A

“W” Hydraulic Power Plant – A

W水力発電所 2016,日本


CONVENT SM

CONVENT SM

On my first visit to this former neuro-psychiatric clinic, only one pavilion was accessible. This is the neo-traditional main building and the neo-Gothic chapel. Both were recently vacated. The main building, built of red brick, originally comprised the administration and the convent of the sisters and included several wings. The chapel of the institution is located in the axis of the main entrance. Both the monastery and the chapel were almost completely emptied, probably in light of the upcoming renovation of the whole. In the chapel you can still find the original confessional and behind the chapel the autopsy table is left in the mortuary. That’s pretty much it as far as furniture is concerned… Nevertheless, it was all in all a nice visit, which yielded some nice pictures, despite the emptiness. 

CLICK HERE to check out the article of my visit to the Sainte Cecile pavilion of this institution, which I visited about a year ago… 


BIOFUEL FARM

BIOFUEL FARM

Even though most of the cars surrounding this old farmhouse are in a deplorable state, this is not really an abandoned location. The property belongs to a garage keeper, who uses this house and the surrounding grounds to stall spare parts. The two love bugs in the front yard look like they only need minimal work. The Chevy Impala in the shed even looks like it’s ready to drive off as it is… The tree-eating truck is a strong contrast. It doesn’t look like it’ll be going anywhere anytime soon… 


CEMETERY OF THE SKULL

CEMETERY OF THE SKULL

By the end of the 18th century, public authorities were obligated to build cemeteries outside their city walls. The council of this particular bought a plot of land from a nearby abbey. In 1787 the first funeral took place here. From the start the cemetery is given a geometric layout with main floats and cross roads. The site is accessible on the west side via a gatehouse with the house of the chaplain and the grave maker. Here the central corridor starts with the calvary cross at the end (photo 4). The graves are in a strict order with the highest class around the Calvary. Over the years, the cemetery had to expand several times until it reached its current area of ​​nearly 30 acres after the First World War. In addition to the parts reserved for war victims, large parts are reserved for the various religious orders and even a plot for the ‘infidels’. There is also a beautiful neo-Gothic chapel with crypt for the canons and bishops, and a ‘lapidarium’ has been installed on the initiative of a commission for the protection of funerary heritage, where valuable funerary monuments are preserved.


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