Gutenberg by Marco Orazi Via Flickr: Dust …

Gutenberg

Gutenberg by Marco Orazi

Via Flickr:

Dust and Silence | Facebook | Tumblr | 500px


Drowning in Glass – 2019

Drowning in Glass – 2019

A former mixed use building containing retail stores and a restaurant on the ground floor and offices on the upper floors in the heart of Downtown Toronto.

Toronto, Ontario, Canada.


Rabbit Graphs – 2019

Rabbit Graphs – 2019

former mixed use building containing retail stores and a restaurant on the ground floor and offices on the upper floors in the heart of Downtown Toronto.

I am by no means a fan of the “green” movement that’s currently popular, there are many reasons for this but I am not going to get into this here. The topic that I will touch on is what the “green” movement doesn’t take into consideration. One of those things is the waste created by demolishing older buildings and replacing them with new ones. This photo is a great example of this since it shows the amount of waste that is created when you demolish a building. This is all just insulation and drywall from the interior demolition of just a couple of rooms. This large building was about 12 stories and using this photo as an example, you can imagine how much waste is created by demolishing one of these older buildings.

Another interesting fact to note is that the creation of concrete accounts for 8% of the world’s CO2 output and concrete is one of, if not the most popular building material used today.

Office Building, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.


MULTICOLOR SCHOOL

MULTICOLOR SCHOOL

Large parts of this former monastery of the Sisters of Charity of Jesus and Mary, founded in 1815, have already been demolished to make way for new buildings. The monastery complex originally included the monastery itself, a semi-public chapel, a nursing home, a kindergarten, a primary school, a secondary school and a public library. The secondary school was transferred to another building and the monastery and nursing home have since been relocated to a new care institution built in the early 1980s. At the end of the 1980s a new monastery for the remaining sisters was built as an extension to this new nursing facility. In this series you can see the part of the school building complex located nearest to the street, the oldest part of which is the primary school, founded in the mid-1860s. At the beginning of the 1920s, the former national household school was added, which later became the primary boys’ school. Judging by the quite advanced decay of the buildings, it is hard to believe that the the property was vacated less than two years ago …


CHAPEL AND MORGUE

CHAPEL AND MORGUE

Construction of this hospital started in the spring of 1905. The official opening was year later. Because of a particularly large number of cases of meningitis in the area, the operations already started a few months earlier, at the beginning of January 1906. At that point the hospital was not yet completed. The hospital later specialized in dermatology, plastic surgery, rheumatology and coloproctology (rectal disorders). Besides that occupational therapy, naturopathy, physiotherapy, pain relief, social services and wound treatment were also offered. In 2011 the majority of the shares were taken over by an investment group. As part of the economic renovation, the hospital was closed and the most recently specialized departments were transferred in July 2013 to a nearby hospital of the same group. The empty building fell partly on the city and partly on the diocese. In the summer of 2014 the building was put into use as emergency accommodation for asylum seekers, but barely one and a half years later the asylum seekers were banned from the hospital. After that it was the intention to demolish part of the hospital and build offices or apartment buildings there and transform the rest of the building into a kindergarten. In November 2018, it was announced that the former hospital would become the construction site of a new residential area. About 350 new apartments will be built on the 45,000 square meter site.


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