COURTHOUSE

COURTHOUSE

After the old courthouse completely burned down at the end of the First World War, the need arose to build a new one. It wasn’t until the mid-1920s before actual plans were made for the new building. The city council organized a competition in which the Brussels architect Jerôme Vermeersch emerged as the winner. Vermeersch started building this courthouse in 1934, but due to financial considerations he needed to execute the design “more soberly” than originally planned. The corner tower turned out a lot smaller and equipped with a pear-shaped spire. Vermeersch resolutely opted for the art deco style for the interior. The building was completed and put into use in 1936. The building became too small over time and after being classified as a monument in 2008, construction of a new and modern courthouse at a different location began. The old court was abandoned in 2011. In the meantime it has been sold to a project developer, who will realize a new housing project in it, taking into account the heritage value.


COURTHOUSE

COURTHOUSE

After the old courthouse completely burned down at the end of the First World War, the need arose to build a new one. It wasn’t until the mid-1920s before actual plans were made for the new building. The city council organized a competition in which the Brussels architect Jerôme Vermeersch emerged as the winner. Vermeersch started building this courthouse in 1934, but due to financial considerations he needed to execute the design “more soberly” than originally planned. The corner tower turned out a lot smaller and equipped with a pear-shaped spire. Vermeersch resolutely opted for the art deco style for the interior. The building was completed and put into use in 1936. The building became too small over time and after being classified as a monument in 2008, construction of a new and modern courthouse at a different location began. The old court was abandoned in 2011. In the meantime it has been sold to a project developer, who will realize a new housing project in it, taking into account the heritage value.


CHATEAU LUMIERE

CHATEAU LUMIERE

Chateau Lumière was built between 1900 and 1903 by the Burrus family, who had made their fortune in the tobacco industry. The Burrus family distinguished themselves in many areas, including charitable works for the benefit of the community in which they lived, such as the construction of a football stadium, a swimming pool and homes for the elderly. The employees of the tobacco factory received much more “benefits” than the law imposed at the time, such as insurance and retirement.

The chateau was designed by Strasbourg architects Gottfried Julius Berninger and Gustave Henri Krafft in the neo-baroque style, which became popular in France at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The neo-baroque, just like the baroque, is characterized by the rich and opulent use of materials, the symmetry and the frequent use of decorations and complex patterns, which are visible in the wrought iron railings around the domain and the wrought iron banisters.

Shortly after completing the chateau, the Burrus dies and his son Maurice Burrus moves into the building. During the First World War, Maurice Burrus refused to supply the German troops with tobacco and had to flee to Switzerland. The chateau was confiscated to accommodate German officers. After the war, Maurice, by now decorated as a war hero, took over the management of the tobacco factory and became an influential figure on an industrial, financial and political level. He had to flee again during the Second World War, this time to his property in the Pyrenees. This time too, his chateau was confiscated by the German army and transformed into a training center for wounded German officers. After WWII he retired to Geneva. Chateau Lumière was initially sold to a religious order, but was later sold to a private owner. In 1993 the chateau was protected as a monument, but since it was uninhabited, it quickly became the object of vandalism. Nowadays, there is very little left of the once so beautiful chateau…


CHATEAU LUMIERE

CHATEAU LUMIERE

Chateau Lumière was built between 1900 and 1903 by the Burrus family, who had made their fortune in the tobacco industry. The Burrus family distinguished themselves in many areas, including charitable works for the benefit of the community in which they lived, such as the construction of a football stadium, a swimming pool and homes for the elderly. The employees of the tobacco factory received much more “benefits” than the law imposed at the time, such as insurance and retirement.

The chateau was designed by Strasbourg architects Gottfried Julius Berninger and Gustave Henri Krafft in the neo-baroque style, which became popular in France at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The neo-baroque, just like the baroque, is characterized by the rich and opulent use of materials, the symmetry and the frequent use of decorations and complex patterns, which are visible in the wrought iron railings around the domain and the wrought iron banisters.

Shortly after completing the chateau, the Burrus dies and his son Maurice Burrus moves into the building. During the First World War, Maurice Burrus refused to supply the German troops with tobacco and had to flee to Switzerland. The chateau was confiscated to accommodate German officers. After the war, Maurice, by now decorated as a war hero, took over the management of the tobacco factory and became an influential figure on an industrial, financial and political level. He had to flee again during the Second World War, this time to his property in the Pyrenees. This time too, his chateau was confiscated by the German army and transformed into a training center for wounded German officers. After WWII he retired to Geneva. Chateau Lumière was initially sold to a religious order, but was later sold to a private owner. In 1993 the chateau was protected as a monument, but since it was uninhabited, it quickly became the object of vandalism. Nowadays, there is very little left of the once so beautiful chateau…


CHATEAU VIGNES VERTES

CHATEAU VIGNES VERTES

This chateau, of which the architect is unknown, was built around 1830 on the site where there was previously a fortified castle. That castle was demolished, but initially the moats were preserved. Later the moats were also filled in to create gardens. The chateau, built in neo-classical style, with numerous references to Italian architecture, has an H-shaped floor plan: a central part, with a transverse wing on either side connecting to it. The remarkable interior reflects the transition from the neoclassical spirit to eclecticism under the July monarchy. Several rooms were decorated with Parisian furniture and curtains from 1830, with fake wood and faux-marble decor, painted ceilings of the Pompey or antique type. Walls covered with wallpaper from the Dufour house. The whole was protected as a heritage in 2000.


CHATEAU VIGNES VERTES

CHATEAU VIGNES VERTES

This chateau, of which the architect is unknown, was built around 1830 on the site where there was previously a fortified castle. That castle was demolished, but initially the moats were preserved. Later the moats were also filled in to create gardens. The chateau, built in neo-classical style, with numerous references to Italian architecture, has an H-shaped floor plan: a central part, with a transverse wing on either side connecting to it. The remarkable interior reflects the transition from the neoclassical spirit to eclecticism under the July monarchy. Several rooms were decorated with Parisian furniture and curtains from 1830, with fake wood and faux-marble decor, painted ceilings of the Pompey or antique type. Walls covered with wallpaper from the Dufour house. The whole was protected as a heritage in 2000.


CHATEAU DES FANTÔMES

CHATEAU DES FANTÔMES

At the gates of Burgundy river, in the middle of the Pays de Bresse, at the top of this wooded hill, the stately Chateau des Fantômes towers above the valley. The foundations of the castle date back to the second half of the 13th century, but it is only at the transition to the 15th century that the whole is made into a fortified fortress. In the 19th century, renovations and expansions are still being carried out on the castle, but since the 1990s the castle has been abandoned and quickly fell into disrepair. The family that owns the property today does not seem inclined to protect the building against further deterioration. This beautiful fairy-tale castle could very well suffer the same fate as the now-disappeared Chateau Miranda in Belgium…


CHATEAU DES FANTÔMES

CHATEAU DES FANTÔMES

At the gates of Burgundy river, in the middle of the Pays de Bresse, at the top of this wooded hill, the stately Chateau des Fantômes towers above the valley. The foundations of the castle date back to the second half of the 13th century, but it is only at the transition to the 15th century that the whole is made into a fortified fortress. In the 19th century, renovations and expansions are still being carried out on the castle, but since the 1990s the castle has been abandoned and quickly fell into disrepair. The family that owns the property today does not seem inclined to protect the building against further deterioration. This beautiful fairy-tale castle could very well suffer the same fate as the now-disappeared Chateau Miranda in Belgium…


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