BLUE CHRIST CHURCH

BLUE CHRIST CHURCH

This neo-Gothic parish church was built in the early 1880s. The brick structure was erected in the form of a cross basilica (a cross church set up as a basilica, which means that the church building has side aisles lower than the middle aisle and that the central aisle above the side aisles is provided with a row of windows). The interior of the church was also neo-Gothic and included a 16th century bluestone baptismal font in Gothic style. Little is left of the original pump and splendor today. Attempts to restore the church were not successful. In 2015, the organ pipes of the valuable 16th century organ were stolen to be sold for scrap…


proj3ctm4yh3m: Brewer’s House Full report an…

proj3ctm4yh3m:

Brewer’s House

Full report and more photos here: https://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2019/02/02/urbex-brewers-house-yorkshire-june-2017/


CRYPTE L

CRYPTE L

Already in 1870 the plan for the construction of this network of underground funeral galleries was created. For the inventor of the plan it was not only a prestige project, but also offered a hygienic solution to the lack of space at the cemeteries in and around the big city. Grave galleries were still a novelty in Northern Europe at that time. Six years later, construction of the galleries began. The first gallery was 31 meters long and was put into operation in 1878. That same year, six new galleries were built, and it was not until around 1890 that the first tunnel system was closed. The most recent part was finished in 1935. The oldest part was built in neoclassical style, the last galleries in art-deco style. The underground passageways, the longest of which extends over a length of three hundred meters, are altogether more than a kilometer long and offer space for more than four thousand burials. The most eye-catching underground burial niches have an above-ground coupled grave monument. The pomp and splendor shows that these underground tombs were mainly intended for the wealthy and powerful families in the city. Many famous figures found a final resting place here… The crypt was recently restored, after years of neglect.


CHATEAU DES LIVRES

CHATEAU DES LIVRES

This “chateau” is not the most famous landmark in the area. A few hundred yards away there is a well-known and extensively documented medieval water castle, but on the background of this building I could not find any information. It is not really a “chateau”, but rather a country house. It seems that it is a former farm house that has been converted into a holiday residence. The most eye-catching space in the building is a lounge / library that was painted strikingly sky-blue. It is because of this space that many name it “Chateau Bleu”. Personally I found the massive presence of books much more notable. There is no room in the building that does not contain a multitude of books. Books on the most diverse subjects, from classical literature, to arts and science, to more technical books. I therefore prefer the name “Chateau des Livres”. Although the chateau seems to look reasonably intact at first sight, the decline has already started. It is clear that nobody has been here for years, except of course for the many urban explorers… Unfortunately vandals and thieves appear to have found their way in too.


CIMENTERIE

CIMENTERIE

Hidden in plain sight, this more than three acres wide industrial site has been waiting for a new destination since the beginning of the 1960s. The former cement factory was established there in 1883 on the site where lime had been extracted from the adjacent quarry since 1881. In the beginning, only lime was produced. Later the activities were expanded with the production of the artificial Portland cement. The factory was equipped with traditional ovens and vertical metal furnaces spread over a dozen atypical industrial buildings. The most striking and most impressive of these constructions is undoubtedly the 130ft high tower, which still contains the rusty remains of the machinery. The southern part of the site, with the old limestone quarry, has now been split off. In the mid-1950s this part was flooded. It is used today by a diving club. Members can dive to a depth of 130ft. The site was sanatized in 2013. A project developer intended to create lofts in the existing buildings, but these plans were never implemented. Meanwhile nature has regained control of the entire site…

The entire set can be viewed on my website. Click here


FOUR DE C.

FOUR DE C.

This steel factory was founded in 1853. When the owner was on the verge of bankruptcy because of the high financial requirements for the construction of a railway, he was saved with the financial help of an accountant within his company. After the death of the founder in 1880, he left the company to that accountant, who continued and expanded the company under his own name. By 1897 the company had 1200 employees. By 1913, the company had two blast furnaces, two batteries of 41 coke ovens; two steel factories, rolling mills, forges, workshops, etc. During the First World War, the factory was dismantled and demolished, but from 1919 it was rebuilt with new blast furnaces and coke ovens with a production capacity of 200.000 tons of iron per year. During the interbellum, there were more expansions to the factory. The company flourished until the 1970s, but from then on, as with other steel industries, was struck by the steel crisis. The number of employees was reduced to one third. From then on, the company had a succession of acquisitions and mergers. The current owner, a Russian partner of the last acquirer, has been producing hot and cold-rolled steel since 2016.


BLACK COKES

BLACK COKES

This coking plant was established in the early 1950s to provide the blast furnaces in the vicinity with coke. The coke is produced from the dry distillation of coal, which is indirectly heated to about 1000 degrees in an oxygen-free environment and the unwanted residual products (hydrogen gas, methane, benzene and tar) are removed. Coke is mainly used to reduce iron ore in a blast furnace into raw iron. The factory occupied an area of ​​17 ha. And in 1981 it was extended with an extra oven battery to a total of 122 ovens. The production capacity then amounted to 750 kton / year. During the 1990s, innovations were still being carried out on the ovens, but after the takeover in 2001, the new operator did not want to invest in the necessary adjustments to deal with many complaints about environmental pollution. At the beginning of 2008 the last kiln was shut down and the coking plant closed. In 2014, the demolition of the installations began. Subsequently, the remediation of the heavily polluted soil is planned.


MANOIR DU COLIMACON BLANC

MANOIR DU COLIMACON BLANC

In the towns archives, this chateau was first mentioned in 1897, when a Parisian wine merchant ordered for a "second home" to be built on the estate. The renovation and extension to the current chateau would only take place in the 1920s by the new owner, who had bought the domain in 1913. He assigned architect Marcel Oudin to remodel the house into a chateau in Art Nouveau style, the style for which this architect was famous. The construction consists mainly of concrete and brick. In the 1970s the estate with the castle was bought by an Iranian businessman, who had the interior restored. He only lived in the chateau for three years before moving to the United States. Contacts between the mayor and the owner of the property in 1999 revealed that the latter did not intend to inhabit the property again, nor to sell it. The chateau soon began to dilapidate, even more so once it fell prey to thieves and vandals. Outside the characteristic white spiral staircase (colimaçon blanc), which was in fact the staff staircase, there remains very little to be photographed today.


BIBLIOPOLIS This beautiful lib…

BIBLIOPOLIS

This beautiful library, dubbed
Bibliopolis in urban exploring circles, is the school library of a college that
was founded in the first half of the 17th century. The college was of Catholic
character and included a kindergarten, a primary school, a college and a
secondary school. Originally the institution was reserved for boys, but in the
1980s it was opened to girls and from then on, received both boys and girls, in
boarding, half board and day school. The library itself was built in the first
half of the 20th century and contained some remarkable pieces, including an
original copy of the encyclopaedia by Diderot and d’Alembert. After years of
persistent financial problems, the college was forced to close its doors in
2012. The whole quickly fell into disrepair and in particular the library
became the victim of theft and vandalism. Valuable copies of books disappeared
or were destroyed. A plan to reopen the school was discontinued in 2016, after
which the decline gradually increased.


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