CHARLIES CHAPEL

CHARLIES CHAPEL

This single-aisled brick chapel in honor of Our Lady of Seven Woes was built in 1883 in neo-gothic style. It is located on the castle domain of Chateau Jumanji and served as a neighborhood chapel and starting point for the district procession. The chapel contains a three-sided choir with a painted wooden altar and with a polychrome statue of Our Lady of Seven Woees. Behind the iron closing gate is a ship with benches. On the walls; white painted images of saints on baroque consoles with angel figures including Saint Joseph, Saint Anthony and Saint Margaret. Although it is listed as heritage, the chapel is in a particularly deplorable condition and there are noticeable cracks in the walls and multiple subsidence. Since the chapel was opened, the situation has only deteriorated visibly. Several statues were destroyed by vandalism. As part of the renovation work on the manor, the chapel has already been emptied in light of the pending renovation…


TOWN MANSION

TOWN MANSION

The impressive Town Mansion was built in 1912 by order of the son of a German entrepreneur who had been based in Antwerp since the mid-19th century and was one of the founders of what would later become the transatlantic shipping company Red Star Line. He inhabited the mansion, with his wife and two sons, until his death in 1937. The eclectic-style mansion with the neo-Louis XVI slant belongs to the later oeuvre of the architect, who built a large number of distinguished townhouses in eclectic and neo-Flemish Renaissance style in Antwerp during the first decades of his career, but later focused on industrial architecture. After the death of the original occupant, the property was sold to a large family, akin to a major inland shipping company. Numerous adjustments and embellishments to the house date from his period, such as the figurative stained glass windows, the paneling and the gold leather in the rear salon and in the large salon the room-wide figurative frieze with classical themes and scenes referring to his trading activities in shipping. After the death of the owner of the house in 1961, his widow continued to live in the mansion until 1963, after which it became the property of the Belgian State. The valuable furniture of this building, which is often inextricably linked to the wall-fixed decoration (tapestries, incorporated into the paneling, paintings on the mantelpieces, and so on), is the property of the provincial administration and has been kept in storage for many years. The intention was to house the official residence of the governor there, but in view of the major renovation costs that the re-use would entail, this never happened. The building has been vacant since the early 1990s, resulting in several squatters. In the spring of 2018 the property was sold to a private owner who wishes to remain anonymous.

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CINE THEATRE VARIA

CINE THEATRE VARIA

Ciné Théatre Varia (popularly called Ciné Varia) is an atypical building in Belgian concrete history, a remnant of the golden age of silent cinema. The Liège architect Eugène Claes (1886-1947) designed the building in 1911, inspired by industrial exhibitions and international events, which took place simultaneously in the major Belgian cities. He resolutely opts for Art Nouveau, which was at the time flourishing throughout Europe. He uses concrete as decorative elements for the facade, consisting of beams and columns with brick filling and decorated with cement decorations. However, the auditorium, with a capacity of 1,100 spectators, is designed in steel, Art Nouveau style with a metal frame to crown the whole. For fire safety reasons when showing films, which was then done by a process with flammable resin (hence the name “film flamme”), the design had to be adapted at the eleventh hour and the concrete was extended to the complete design of the theater. Construction was completed in 1913, but the building wasn’t inaugurated until 1917. The Varia can look back with pride on celebrities such as Bourvil, Adamo, Fernandel and Johny Halliday, who populated the stage during the golden 1950s and 60s. In the 1980s, however, things went sideways quickly for the once popular theater. Partly due to concerns about the stability of the building, the curtain for the Varia finally falls in 1986. The facade of the building was classified as a monument in 1992 and is currently still under construction for renovation. For the rest of the building, the future is not looking very good. After all, that part is not classified and estimates for its renovation amount to no less than 5 million euros…


BRAUEREI IBING

BRAUEREI IBING

Friedrich and Richard Ibing were born as the youngest sons of a famous clothmaker’s family, who had been active in the textile industry for over 200 years. However, the decline of this industry was already apparent in the 19th century. The artisanal companies could no longer compete with industrially manufactured English fabrics. It is therefore not surprising that people started to look for other forms of employment. In May 1863, the brothers Friedrich and Richard Ibing acquired two plots of land from a former quarry, where they developed their activities. After seven years the company needed to be expand, but this was not possible at this location. In April 1870 an area of ​​almost 10,000 square meters was acquired, on which a spacious new building was erected. From the beginning, the Ibing brewery was one of the leading Mülheim breweries. The brewery also enjoyed fame outside the borders. At the World Exhibition in Paris in 1889, the beer from the Ibing brewery even received a gold medal. In 1892, Friedrich Ibing died of a stroke at the age of 58. Hugo Ibing, the eldest of the two sons of Friedrich Ibing, joined the management of the brewery at the age of 23 and led the business with great success with his uncle. At the beginning of the 20th century, the brewery had an annual brewing capacity of 60,000 to 65,000 hectoliters. The number of employees rose from 30 in 1900 to 62 in 1908. Erich Ibing, the last descendant of the founders, led the brewery for only a short time. In 1955 the Ibing family sold the company. Despite all the guarantees that it was not the intention to close the brewery, in February 1968, five years after the 100th anniversary of the brewery, the factory gates were closed forever. For more than 50 years the complex was left to decay and today only the ruins are still visible.


LIMESTONE FACTORY

LIMESTONE FACTORY

The lime kilns mark a turning point in the industrial history of this small town. Halfway through the 16th century, according to the parish registers, there was already industrial exploitation of the quarries to a certain extent. In the mid-1850s, the municipality built a first oven. Almost 25 years later, a second oven was built and paid for by the operator of the first oven. Since 1890 the company has been operated by the same family. A third lime kiln was built in collaboration with another family. By the 1920s, these three ovens were operating at full capacity, only to be stopped some fifty years later. A large part of the old buildings has been abandoned. The buildings you see in the photos belong to the old forge, which now houses a museum.


BERNINA’S BROTHER

BERNINA’S BROTHER

After a major fire, which destroyed nearly 600 wooden houses in the center of the city at the end of the 17th century, this beautiful town house was one of the rare first stone bourgeois buildings in the city. The building was built in Louis XVI style, a rather austere and symmetrical style, characterized by classicistic decorations, such as the wooden dormer windows and the triangular pediment. In the 19th century, the then owners established a cotton factory on the site, which, thanks to sensible management and timely modernization, grew into a successful company during the Industrial Revolution. In the beginning of the 20th century, the buildings were sold and converted into a craft school that soon proved to be of great importance for the development of the city’s textile industry. In 2008 the last students moved away from these historic buildings. The entire complex has since been sold and will be developed into a new residential project with respect for the historic buildings. These works are currently in full swing.


PRISON H7

PRISON H7

Prison H7 was the jail block of a military barracks in a large Belgian city. The buildings were erected in eclectic style between 1890 and 1905, based on a design by the architects de Noyette and Geerling. All in all, the barracks occupy an area of ​​more than 5 acres and could house around 1300 soldiers. On October 1, 1907 the 2nd Line Regiment moved into the barracks. During the two world wars, the barracks were occupied by German troops. After the liberation, the 2nd Line Regiment did not return to its barracks. From 1955 the barracks were manned by the Center of the Health Service. The training center provided the training for the officers of the Health Service. Following the restructuring of the armed forces, a number of buildings were sold to the city, which housed the Higher Institute of Fine Arts there since 2007 (hence the statues). Other parts of the barracks are still owned by the Belgian army. Mid-March 2019 the reconversion work started to turn the barracks into a sustainable urban neighborhood where living, working and recreation meet.


PRISON H7

PRISON H7

Prison H7 was the jail block of a military barracks in a large Belgian city. The buildings were erected in eclectic style between 1890 and 1905, based on a design by the architects de Noyette and Geerling. All in all, the barracks occupy an area of ​​more than 5 acres and could house around 1300 soldiers. On October 1, 1907 the 2nd Line Regiment moved into the barracks. During the two world wars, the barracks were occupied by German troops. After the liberation, the 2nd Line Regiment did not return to its barracks. From 1955 the barracks were manned by the Center of the Health Service. The training center provided the training for the officers of the Health Service. Following the restructuring of the armed forces, a number of buildings were sold to the city, which housed the Higher Institute of Fine Arts there since 2007 (hence the statues). Other parts of the barracks are still owned by the Belgian army. Mid-March 2019 the reconversion work started to turn the barracks into a sustainable urban neighborhood where living, working and recreation meet.


darbians: The surgery of a vast sanatorium in…

darbians:

The surgery of a vast sanatorium in Germany.

Check the link for more from here…

Beelitz Surgery


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