TOWN MANSION

TOWN MANSION

The impressive Town Mansion was built in 1912 by order of the son of a German entrepreneur who had been based in Antwerp since the mid-19th century and was one of the founders of what would later become the transatlantic shipping company Red Star Line. He inhabited the mansion, with his wife and two sons, until his death in 1937. The eclectic-style mansion with the neo-Louis XVI slant belongs to the later oeuvre of the architect, who built a large number of distinguished townhouses in eclectic and neo-Flemish Renaissance style in Antwerp during the first decades of his career, but later focused on industrial architecture. After the death of the original occupant, the property was sold to a large family, akin to a major inland shipping company. Numerous adjustments and embellishments to the house date from his period, such as the figurative stained glass windows, the paneling and the gold leather in the rear salon and in the large salon the room-wide figurative frieze with classical themes and scenes referring to his trading activities in shipping. After the death of the owner of the house in 1961, his widow continued to live in the mansion until 1963, after which it became the property of the Belgian State. The valuable furniture of this building, which is often inextricably linked to the wall-fixed decoration (tapestries, incorporated into the paneling, paintings on the mantelpieces, and so on), is the property of the provincial administration and has been kept in storage for many years. The intention was to house the official residence of the governor there, but in view of the major renovation costs that the re-use would entail, this never happened. The building has been vacant since the early 1990s, resulting in several squatters. In the spring of 2018 the property was sold to a private owner who wishes to remain anonymous.

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darbians: Abandoned chateau in Belgium

darbians:

Abandoned chateau in Belgium

Check the link for more from here…

Chateau Rochendaal


darbians: Abandoned chateau in Belgium

darbians:

Abandoned chateau in Belgium

Check the link for more from here…

Chateau Rochendaal


Abandoned chateau in Belgium

Abandoned chateau in Belgium

Check the link for more from here…

Chateau Rochendaal


Abandoned chateau in Belgium

Abandoned chateau in Belgium

Check the link for more from here…

Chateau Rochendaal


CHATEAU LUMIERE

CHATEAU LUMIERE

Chateau Lumière was built between 1900 and 1903 by the Burrus family, who had made their fortune in the tobacco industry. The Burrus family distinguished themselves in many areas, including charitable works for the benefit of the community in which they lived, such as the construction of a football stadium, a swimming pool and homes for the elderly. The employees of the tobacco factory received much more “benefits” than the law imposed at the time, such as insurance and retirement.

The chateau was designed by Strasbourg architects Gottfried Julius Berninger and Gustave Henri Krafft in the neo-baroque style, which became popular in France at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The neo-baroque, just like the baroque, is characterized by the rich and opulent use of materials, the symmetry and the frequent use of decorations and complex patterns, which are visible in the wrought iron railings around the domain and the wrought iron banisters.

Shortly after completing the chateau, the Burrus dies and his son Maurice Burrus moves into the building. During the First World War, Maurice Burrus refused to supply the German troops with tobacco and had to flee to Switzerland. The chateau was confiscated to accommodate German officers. After the war, Maurice, by now decorated as a war hero, took over the management of the tobacco factory and became an influential figure on an industrial, financial and political level. He had to flee again during the Second World War, this time to his property in the Pyrenees. This time too, his chateau was confiscated by the German army and transformed into a training center for wounded German officers. After WWII he retired to Geneva. Chateau Lumière was initially sold to a religious order, but was later sold to a private owner. In 1993 the chateau was protected as a monument, but since it was uninhabited, it quickly became the object of vandalism. Nowadays, there is very little left of the once so beautiful chateau…


CHATEAU LUMIERE

CHATEAU LUMIERE

Chateau Lumière was built between 1900 and 1903 by the Burrus family, who had made their fortune in the tobacco industry. The Burrus family distinguished themselves in many areas, including charitable works for the benefit of the community in which they lived, such as the construction of a football stadium, a swimming pool and homes for the elderly. The employees of the tobacco factory received much more “benefits” than the law imposed at the time, such as insurance and retirement.

The chateau was designed by Strasbourg architects Gottfried Julius Berninger and Gustave Henri Krafft in the neo-baroque style, which became popular in France at the end of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The neo-baroque, just like the baroque, is characterized by the rich and opulent use of materials, the symmetry and the frequent use of decorations and complex patterns, which are visible in the wrought iron railings around the domain and the wrought iron banisters.

Shortly after completing the chateau, the Burrus dies and his son Maurice Burrus moves into the building. During the First World War, Maurice Burrus refused to supply the German troops with tobacco and had to flee to Switzerland. The chateau was confiscated to accommodate German officers. After the war, Maurice, by now decorated as a war hero, took over the management of the tobacco factory and became an influential figure on an industrial, financial and political level. He had to flee again during the Second World War, this time to his property in the Pyrenees. This time too, his chateau was confiscated by the German army and transformed into a training center for wounded German officers. After WWII he retired to Geneva. Chateau Lumière was initially sold to a religious order, but was later sold to a private owner. In 1993 the chateau was protected as a monument, but since it was uninhabited, it quickly became the object of vandalism. Nowadays, there is very little left of the once so beautiful chateau…


CHATEAU VIGNES VERTES

CHATEAU VIGNES VERTES

This chateau, of which the architect is unknown, was built around 1830 on the site where there was previously a fortified castle. That castle was demolished, but initially the moats were preserved. Later the moats were also filled in to create gardens. The chateau, built in neo-classical style, with numerous references to Italian architecture, has an H-shaped floor plan: a central part, with a transverse wing on either side connecting to it. The remarkable interior reflects the transition from the neoclassical spirit to eclecticism under the July monarchy. Several rooms were decorated with Parisian furniture and curtains from 1830, with fake wood and faux-marble decor, painted ceilings of the Pompey or antique type. Walls covered with wallpaper from the Dufour house. The whole was protected as a heritage in 2000.


CHATEAU VIGNES VERTES

CHATEAU VIGNES VERTES

This chateau, of which the architect is unknown, was built around 1830 on the site where there was previously a fortified castle. That castle was demolished, but initially the moats were preserved. Later the moats were also filled in to create gardens. The chateau, built in neo-classical style, with numerous references to Italian architecture, has an H-shaped floor plan: a central part, with a transverse wing on either side connecting to it. The remarkable interior reflects the transition from the neoclassical spirit to eclecticism under the July monarchy. Several rooms were decorated with Parisian furniture and curtains from 1830, with fake wood and faux-marble decor, painted ceilings of the Pompey or antique type. Walls covered with wallpaper from the Dufour house. The whole was protected as a heritage in 2000.


CHATEAU DES FANTÔMES

CHATEAU DES FANTÔMES

At the gates of Burgundy river, in the middle of the Pays de Bresse, at the top of this wooded hill, the stately Chateau des Fantômes towers above the valley. The foundations of the castle date back to the second half of the 13th century, but it is only at the transition to the 15th century that the whole is made into a fortified fortress. In the 19th century, renovations and expansions are still being carried out on the castle, but since the 1990s the castle has been abandoned and quickly fell into disrepair. The family that owns the property today does not seem inclined to protect the building against further deterioration. This beautiful fairy-tale castle could very well suffer the same fate as the now-disappeared Chateau Miranda in Belgium…


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