Whittington Estate

modernistliving:

Whittington Estate

Whittington Estate, N19

Peter Tabori, 1972-9

The Whittington Estate was designed by Peter Tabori who trained under Erno Goldfinger during Camden Council’s ‘golden age’ of progressive social-housing development. There are a mix of private ownership and social housing in the estate. 

Whittington Estate
Whittington Estate

The estate is well designed and laid out. Some of the upper flats are accessed through a set of stairs and then a walkway which creates an area of open space and deters non-social behaviour. 

Whittington Estate
Whittington Estate

There are a total of six parallel terraces which comprises of 271 units. The estate includes: Lulot Gardens, Retcar Place, Sandstone Place and Stoneleigh Terrace. The private units do go on the market once in a while and they get snatched up quickly as the popularity of modernist estates and ex-council homes continue to rise. I have seen the price of a one bedroom flat go for £295,000 in 2013 and then £399,950 in 2015! It is a great investment and this of course entices those cash buyer investors. 

Whittington Estate
Whittington Estate

socialistmodernism: Federal Executive Council …

socialistmodernism:

Federal Executive Council SIV 3 Novi Beograd,
Belgrade, Serbia,
built in 1975
Architect Ljupko Curcic
© BACU @_ba_cu #_ba_cu
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The American Press Institute (pre-demolition)

brutalwashington:

The American Press Institute was situated in Reston, sitting back from the main road with views of an open field with trees at the far end of it. The low two-story structure was partially sunken into the earth, its slim profile and plain construction causing it to sit very much in harmony with the landscape it was situated in. Large windows looked out on the surrounding vegetation, giving the illusion of seclusion despite the proximity of a major highway. Inside, floors and furniture were decked in bright colors, both accentuating and contrasting the exposed concrete within. Rather than being an afterthought, halls were spacious with high ceilings, matching the meeting rooms that sprouted off of it.
Why is all this in the past tense? After much debate, including a last-ditch effort to save the building by declaring it historic, the Fairfax Board of Directors elected to move forward with a project to demolish the building making way for a series of bland row houses. This conflict is a microcosm of the larger threat to Brutalist buildings as they age and eventually need to be replaced.

Download my book: Brutal Washington


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